Pelargonium fulgidum (L.) L'Hérit.
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Campylia
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Ciconium
Cortusina
Glaucophyllum
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Isopetalum
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Pelargonium
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Subsucculentia


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Hort. Kew. ed. 1,2 (1789) 422.
Section Ligularia

Habit
Smally shrubby plant <1 m, though often growing among other plants supported by branches and capable of reaching a couple of meters. Stems half-succulent, becoming woody with age and covered with persistent membraneous stipules. 



Leaves
Lamina oblong-cordate, 3-10 x 2-7 cm, pinnately deeply incised, 3-6 partite towards the base, with the lobes variously incised. Petioles 2-9 cm, covered with long soft hairs. Stipules large, broadly ovate, fused with the base of petioles.


Inflorescence
Peduncles branched carrying 4-9-flowered pseudo-umbels. Flowers borne above the foliage. The hypanthium is prominent and contrasts with the thin pedicel. 


Sepals
5, reflexed.

Petals
Petals 5, scarlet or carmine.

Stamens
7 fertile.

Distribution


Habitat

The species is confined to the western coastal districts from Yzerfontein to Orange River, growing on rocky exposed, wind-swept sandhills. Above, a plant from the 
Seeberg in the West Coast National Park in W Cape, growing amidst succulent shrubs. 


Seeberg is a picturesque spot with views of the cold Atlantic, overlooking the National Park. Only a short drive from Capetown, the Park transforms into a colourful garden each spring.


Lachenalia aloides is one of the incredibly beautiful bulbs abundant in the West Coast National Park. This is one of the most showy species, and is easily grown in gardens in temperate climates.

Synonim
tectum (Thunb.) DC.

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